February 05, 2008

Name of the Week, Revisited

I got a great comment this morning on the last Baseball Player Name of the Week post, regarding Ferd Eunick. This is one of those things that just makes you love the internet. Writes Kimberly Eunick Hay:
"Well, I can tell you what I know about my grandfather, Fernandas Bowen Eunick. He died in 1959, 8 years before I was born in Baltimore, MD. Played high school ball against Hall of Famer George Herman (Babe) Ruth. Worked his way through the minor leagues, played in Montreal, among other places til he got his shot at the show in 1917. Played in one game at the end of the season. Cleveland wanted him to come back the next year, but his future father-in-law made him decide - baseball or my grandmother. And he chose to walk away from his dream for her. He never really forgot the game - played semi-pro ball as long as he could and died - literally - at an Old Timers event at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium on December 9, 1959. He was inducted in the Maryland Professional Baseball Hall of Fame in 1956 - I have the trophy and pics of him receiving it at home.

And for the record - NO ONE called him Fred - no idea where they got that from.

When people ask that question about any person, dead or alive you'd want to have lunch with - my answer would always be him. Very proud to know my grandad pursued his dreams."
Well, that explains the two career at-bats; playing high school ball against Babe Ruth, then passing away at an Old Timers Day -- it's hard to top that as bookends to a baseball life. Thanks to Ms. Hay for taking the time to write.

2 comments:

yfib said...

that is a great story and it is pretty amazing that it found its way to you so quickly.

the internet is a wonderful thing.

GLScoop said...

I know - someone sent it to me. I doubt I would have found it myself - although I do Google Grandad from time to time and have talked to a number of Indians fans about him. Between the odd name and the few at bats they always have questions. Sadly, so do I - but I have the stories my Dad shared with me as well.

Kimberly Ann Eunick Hay